The effects of lipid-lowering therapy on low-density lipoprotein auto-antibodies: relationship with low-density lipoprotein oxidation and plasma total antioxidant status


OREM C. , Orem A. , UYDU H., CELIK S., ERDOL C. , KURAL B.

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE, cilt.13, ss.65-71, 2002 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

Özet

Background Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) is believed to play an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis. Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a prerequisite for rapid accumulation of LDL in macrophages and for the formation of foam cells. Because of high antioxidant levels in plasma, LDL oxidation is suggested to occur mainly in the subendothelial space of the arterial wall, where there is the concomitant presence of large amounts of reactive oxygen species generated by endothelial cells and activated leukocytes. After Ox-LDL formation, antibodies against this form of LDL may occur. Auto-antibodies against Ox-LDL (AuAb-Ox-LDL) show directly in in-vivo LDL oxidation. Many studies have indicated that the amount of antibodies in serum is positively correlated to the rate of progression of atherosclerotic plaques.