EXPERIENCE ARCHITECTURE IN DISASTER TIMES, MEANING-CRISIS, AND EXPLANATION OF SUFFERING WITH RELIGIOUS REFERENCES


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SEVİNÇ B.

HITIT UNIVERSITESI ILAHIYAT FAKULTESI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF DIVINITY FACULTY OF HITIT UNIVERSITY, vol.19, no.2, pp.951-982, 2020 (Journal Indexed in ESCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 19 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.14395/hititilahiyat.774316
  • Title of Journal : HITIT UNIVERSITESI ILAHIYAT FAKULTESI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF DIVINITY FACULTY OF HITIT UNIVERSITY
  • Page Numbers: pp.951-982

Abstract

Society is a human construction; a system of meaning is established in this built world, as well as an order with reference to it. The sociality of man is also an expression of his desire and tendency towards the construction of nomos. His relationship with society is interactive in the sense that it is a stage in a long story. Mankind becomes effective in the formation of the world with the meaning codes and knowledge stocks they have internalized in the world in which they exist. Religion is the most fundamental element of their attempt to establish and maintain this world. Religion functions as a reference for meaning, especially in marginal periods, just as it did in ordinary times. The marginal situation experienced with the COVID-19 pandemic today faces the desire to be explained and interpreted in line with the human tendency of finding an explanation of events that are the source of pain and suffering. Although it is essentially a philosophical debate, in essence, it has been the subject of sociology since leading sociologists and for the first time discussed by Max Weber on social ground. In this study, the question of theodicy in the phenomenological approaches of Peter Berger and Thomas Luckmann and the place and function of marginal situations in the human search for meaning are questioned. In this context, the findings obtained through the documentation method are evaluated on the basis of the primary claim of the study. As a result, it is determined that individuals and groups do not establish a world based only on felicific events, and marginal experiences such as death, epidemic, pain, and suffering also function as a source of meaning.