Wearable Vibration Based Computer Interaction and Communication System for Deaf


Creative Commons License

YAĞANOĞLU M., KÖSE C.

APPLIED SCIENCES-BASEL, cilt.7, 2017 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 7 Konu: 12
  • Basım Tarihi: 2017
  • Doi Numarası: 10.3390/app7121296
  • Dergi Adı: APPLIED SCIENCES-BASEL

Özet

In individuals with impaired hearing, determining the direction of sound is a significant problem. The direction of sound was determined in this study, which allowed hearing impaired individuals to perceive where sounds originated. This study also determined whether something was being spoken loudly near the hearing impaired individual. In this manner, it was intended that they should be able to recognize panic conditions more quickly. The developed wearable system has four microphone inlets, two vibration motor outlets, and four Light Emitting Diode (LED) outlets. The vibration of motors placed on the right and left fingertips permits the indication of the direction of sound through specific vibration frequencies. This study applies the ReliefF feature selection method to evaluate every feature in comparison to other features and determine which features are more effective in the classification phase. This study primarily selects the best feature extraction and classification methods. Then, the prototype device has been tested using these selected methods on themselves. ReliefF feature selection methods are used in the studies; the success of K nearest neighborhood (Knn) classification had a 93% success rate and classification with Support Vector Machine (SVM) had a 94% success rate. At close range, SVM and two of the best feature methods were used and returned a 98% success rate. When testing our wearable devices on users in real time, we used a classification technique to detect the direction and our wearable devices responded in 0.68 s; this saves power in comparison to traditional direction detection methods. Meanwhile, if there was an echo in an indoor environment, the success rate increased; the echo canceller was disabled in environments without an echo to save power. We also compared our system with the localization algorithm based on the microphone array; the wearable device that we developed had a high success rate and it produced faster results at lower cost than other methods. This study provides a new idea for the benefit of deaf individuals that is preferable to a computer environment.