Post-collisional adakitic volcanism in the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey: evidence for slab and crustal melting


Dokuz A., UYSAL İ. , Siebel W., Turan M. , Duncan R., Akcay M.

CONTRIBUTIONS TO MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY, cilt.166, ss.1443-1468, 2013 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 166 Konu: 5
  • Basım Tarihi: 2013
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1007/s00410-013-0936-8
  • Dergi Adı: CONTRIBUTIONS TO MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1443-1468

Özet

New geochemical and isotopic data for post-collisional Early Eocene and Late Miocene adakitic rocks from the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey, indicate that slab and lower crustal melting, respectively, played key roles in the petrogenesis of these rocks. The Early Eocene YoncalA +/- k dacite (54.4 Ma) exhibits high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, moderate Mg# (44-65), and relatively high epsilon Nd and low ISr values, similar to adakites formed by slab melting associated with subduction. Geochemical composition of the YoncalA +/- k dacite cannot be explained by simple crystal fractionation and/or crustal contamination of andesitic parent magma, but is consistent with the participation of different proportions of melts derived from subducted basalt and sediments. Sr/Y correlates horizontally with Rb/Y, and Pb/Nd correlates vertically with Nd isotopic composition, indicating that Sr and Pb budgets are strongly controlled by melt addition from the subducting slab, whereas positive correlations between Th/Nd and Pb/Nd, and Rb/Y and Nb/Y point to some contribution of sediment melt. In addition to low concentrations of heavy rare earth elements (similar to 2-3 times chondrite), a systematic decrease in their concentrations and Nb/Ta ratios with increasing SiO2 contents suggests that slab partial melting occurred in the garnet stability field and that these elements were mobilized by fluid flux. These geochemical and isotopic signatures are best explained by slab breakoff and fusion shortly after the initiation of collision. Although the Late Micone TavdagA +/- rhyolite (8.75 Ma) has some geochemical features identical to adakites, such as high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, other requirements, such as sodic andesite and/or dacite with relatively high MgO and Mg# (> 50), relatively high Ni and Cr, low K2O/Na2O (< 0.4), high Sr (> 400 ppm), for slab-derived adakites are not provided. It is sodic in composition and shows no traces of fractionation from dacitic parent magma. Low Nd and high Sr isotope ratios suggest derivation by partial fusion of calc-alkaline, juvenile crust with high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios.

New geochemical and isotopic data for post-collisional Early Eocene and Late Miocene adakitic rocks from the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey, indicate that slab and lower crustal melting, respectively, played key roles in the petrogenesis of these rocks. The Early Eocene YoncalA +/- k dacite (54.4 Ma) exhibits high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, moderate Mg# (44-65), and relatively high epsilon Nd and low ISr values, similar to adakites formed by slab melting associated with subduction. Geochemical composition of the YoncalA +/- k dacite cannot be explained by simple crystal fractionation and/or crustal contamination of andesitic parent magma, but is consistent with the participation of different proportions of melts derived from subducted basalt and sediments. Sr/Y correlates horizontally with Rb/Y, and Pb/Nd correlates vertically with Nd isotopic composition, indicating that Sr and Pb budgets are strongly controlled by melt addition from the subducting slab, whereas positive correlations between Th/Nd and Pb/Nd, and Rb/Y and Nb/Y point to some contribution of sediment melt. In addition to low concentrations of heavy rare earth elements (similar to 2-3 times chondrite), a systematic decrease in their concentrations and Nb/Ta ratios with increasing SiO2 contents suggests that slab partial melting occurred in the garnet stability field and that these elements were mobilized by fluid flux. These geochemical and isotopic signatures are best explained by slab breakoff and fusion shortly after the initiation of collision. Although the Late Micone TavdagA +/- rhyolite (8.75 Ma) has some geochemical features identical to adakites, such as high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, other requirements, such as sodic andesite and/or dacite with relatively high MgO and Mg# (> 50), relatively high Ni and Cr, low K2O/Na2O (< 0.4), high Sr (> 400 ppm), for slab-derived adakites are not provided. It is sodic in composition and shows no traces of fractionation from dacitic parent magma. Low Nd and high Sr isotope ratios suggest derivation by partial fusion of calc-alkaline, juvenile crust with high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios.