Energy services and energy poverty for sustainable rural development


Kaygusuz K.

RENEWABLE & SUSTAINABLE ENERGY REVIEWS, vol.15, no.2, pp.936-947, 2011 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Review
  • Volume: 15 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.rser.2010.11.003
  • Title of Journal : RENEWABLE & SUSTAINABLE ENERGY REVIEWS
  • Page Numbers: pp.936-947

Abstract

In many rural areas, poor people still depend on wood and other biomass fuels for most of their household and income-generating activities. The difficult, time-consuming work of collecting and managing traditional fuels is widely viewed as women's responsibility, which is a factor in women's disproportionate lack of access to education and income, and inability to escape from poverty. Therefore, it is important for energy access programs to have a special focus on women. New options for energy access and sustainable livelihoods, like small-scale biofuels production, can have dramatic benefits for rural women, and their families and communities. Energy development, as both a driving force and a consequence of such tremendous changes, has had profound impact on economic, social, and environmental development. Rural energy has always been a critical issue due to years of energy shortage for both households and industries. Biomass, for long time, has been the only available fuel in many rural areas. The situation in rural areas is even more critical as local demand for energy outstrips availability and the vast majority of people depend on non-commercial energy supplies. Energy is needed for household uses, such as cooking, lighting, heating; for agricultural uses, such as tilling, irrigation and post-harvest processing; and for rural industry uses, such as milling and mechanical energy and process heat. Energy is also an input to water supply, communication, commerce, health, education and transportation in rural areas. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.