Device-Associated Hospital Infections in Neurology-Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit of Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine


KAYA S. , YILMAZ G. , ÇAKIR E. , ALİOĞLU Z. , BAYRAMOĞLU G. , KOKSAL I.

JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES-TURKISH, cilt.27, sa.3, ss.302-310, 2010 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 27 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2010
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES-TURKISH
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.302-310

Özet

In this study, we aimed to calculate device utilization ratios and device-associated infection rates to examine isolated agents and infection control measures in the Neurology-Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit (NNICU) of Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine between January 2007-December 2008. Patients were followed with active prospective surveillance method by infection control team. The diagnosis of hospital infections was based on the criteria of Center for Diseases Prevention and Control (CDC). Device-associated infection rates were calculated based on National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NNIS) recommendations. The most common device associated infections were ventilator-associated pneumoniae (VAP) and urinary catheter related urinary system infection (UC-USI) in our unit. In 2007 and 2008 years, mechanical ventilatory, central venous catheter and urinary catheter utilization rates were 0.17-0.28, 0.25-0.16 and 0.98-0.95 respectively. Device-associated infection rates at our unit in the following two years were as follows; VAP rates 21-24.3/1000 ventilatory days, central venous catheter related blood stream infections (CVC-BSI) 18.5-24.7/1000 central venous catheter days, UC-USI 8.5-2.6/1000 urinary catheter days. Although VAP and CVC-BSI rates were increased markedly, UC-USI rates were decreased by 2008 (p<0.05 for all these infections). Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp. and coagulase negative staphylococcus were the most commonly isolated microorganisms from patients. In order to decrease the device-associated infections, suitable physical environment should be ensured as a priority for intensive-care units. Increased compliance with infection control measures such as handwashing, limitation of invasive-devices utilization and using aseptic techniques in catheterization are some other important approaches.