Acute pancreatitis in children: A single center experience over ten years


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Sag E. , KAYA G. , BAHAT ÖZDOĞAN E. , KARAHAN S. C. , İMAMOĞLU M. , SARIHAN H. , ...Daha Fazla

TURKISH JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, cilt.60, ss.153-158, 2018 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 60 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2018
  • Doi Numarası: 10.24953/turkjped.2018.02.006
  • Dergi Adı: TURKISH JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.153-158

Özet

Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by sudden onset abdominal pain together with elevation of pancreatic enzymes and radiographic changes. Increased incidence of AP in children have been reported in recent reports. In this study; we aimed to analyze the demographic characteristics, etiology, outcome and incidence of AP among hospitalized children in our center. Medical records of the children with AP since January 2005 were analyzed from hospital files (N=63). Major etiologies were systemic diseases (14.3%), trauma (11.1%), cholelithiasis (9.5%); 54% (N=34) of the patients had mild AP, while 28.6% (N=18) had moderately severe AP and 17.4% (N=11) had severe AP. Organ dysfunction was found in 11 patients (17.4%) at initial examination. During the follow-up period (68.1 +/- 24.3 months), 10 patients (15.9%) experienced 24 recurring AP (RAP) attacks. Male gender, presence of local pancreatic or systemic complications at initial attack, metabolic and hereditary diseases were associated with the increased risk of RAP (p<0.05 for all). The mortality rate associated with AP was 4.84%. There was an increase in the incidence of AP since 2010 (9.57 in 2009-2010 vs. 39.17/10,000 patients in 2015-2016 years; p=0.0002; OR: 4.1) among the hospitalized patients. Our results indicate that AP is a mild disease in children and the incidence is increasing among hospitalized children. Male gender, presence of local pancreatic or systemic complications at initial attack, metabolic diseases and hereditary diseases were associated with the increased risk of RAP.