Your country is your routine: The evacuation, quarantine, and management of behavioral problems of a child with autism during COVID-19 pandemic


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Turan B., Kocarslan N., Gulsen M., Dursun O. B.

DUSUNEN ADAM-JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES, vol.33, no.3, pp.310-312, 2020 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 33 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.14744/dajpns.2020.00095
  • Journal Name: DUSUNEN ADAM-JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES
  • Journal Indexes: Emerging Sources Citation Index, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psycinfo, TR DİZİN (ULAKBİM)
  • Page Numbers: pp.310-312
  • Keywords: Autism spectrum disorder, COVID-19, integrative psychiatry

Abstract

As the COVID-19 outbreak has begun spreading around the globe, all countries reacted to the thread with a series of measures in varying degrees. The Special Children Support System (SCSS) is a system designed to provide multidisciplinary support for behavioral problems of (children with mental special needs) CMSN that occurred during COVID-19 Pandemic and related home confinement. The system combines the telehealth applications with the services from local psychosocial intervention teams. In this case report, we will present an 11-year old child with autism spectrum disorder who returned from the United Kingdom to Turkey and were held in a dormitory for a 14-day quarantine and managed with a telehealth based system developed by our institution to specifically support children with special needs during COVID 19 pandemic. Considering the nature of the disorder in individuals with autism, due to the negative effects of environment and routine change, the intervention to be made to these individuals must be early and ready. Since the first day of our case, with the intensive application of both behavioral and medical treatment with a multidisciplinary team, a significant change was seen in our patient's symptoms, therefore, it supports the idea that rapid intervention and a ready system are crucial.